about projects people publications resources resources visit us visit us search search

Quick Links

Recent Citations

Structures of human Nav1.7 channel in complex with auxiliary subunits and animal toxins. Shen H, Liu D et al. Science. 2019 Mar 22;363(6433):1303-1308.

Global computational mutagenesis of domain structures associated with inherited eye disease. Ortiz FW, Sergeev YV. Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 6;9(1):3676.

Mechanism of actin polymerization revealed by cryo-EM structures of actin filaments with three different bound nucleotides. Chou SZ, Pollard TD. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2019 Mar 5;116(10):4265-4274.

Cryo-EM of retinoschisin branched networks suggests an intercellular adhesive scaffold in the retina. Heymann JB, Vijayasarathy C et al. J Cell Biol. 2019 Mar 4;218(3):1027-1038.

Assessing the predictive power of relative binding free energy calculations for test cases involving displacement of binding site water molecules. Wahl J, Smieško M. J Chem Inf Model. 2019 Feb 25;59(2):754-765.

(Previously featured citations...)

Chimera Search

Google™ Search

News

November 17, 2018

Chimera production release 1.13.1 is now available; see the release notes for what's new. The Mac version requires OS 10.10 or later.

October 22, 2018

Mac users: the 1.13.1 release candidate and recent daily builds contain a fix for Mojave (OS 10.14). These versions require OS 10.10 or later.

September 21, 2018

Mac users are advised to hold off upgrading to Mojave until we find a fix for Chimera buttons not being shown until the windows containing them are resized.

(Previous news...)

Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a highly extensible program for interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, supramolecular assemblies, sequence alignments, docking results, trajectories, and conformational ensembles. High-quality images and animations can be generated. Chimera includes complete documentation and several tutorials, and can be downloaded free of charge for academic, government, nonprofit, and personal use. Chimera is developed by the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI), supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (P41-GM103311).

UCSF ChimeraX (or simply ChimeraX) is the next-generation molecular visualization program from the RBVI, following UCSF Chimera.

Feature Highlight

Consurf coloring and alignment

Showing ConSurf Results

The ConSurf Server provides results as Chimera Web data; after browser configuration, a single click displays the color-coded query structure and multiple sequence alignment with phylogenetic tree and custom headers in a locally installed copy of Chimera (details).

Special thanks to Elana Erez and the Ben-Tal and Pupko groups at Tel Aviv University, and to Fabian Glaser at the Technion.

(More features...)

Gallery Sample

Peroxiredoxin Wreath

Peroxiredoxins are enzymes that help cells cope with stressors such as high levels of reactive oxygen species. The image shows a decameric peroxiredoxin from human red blood cells (Protein Data Bank entry 1qmv), styled as a holiday wreath.

See also the RBVI holiday card gallery.

(More samples...)


About RBVI | Projects | People | Publications | Resources | Visit Us

Copyright 2018 Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.