<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">Hi Oliver,<div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">&nbsp; I have played with coloring volumetric (“solid” style) rendering in Chimera. &nbsp;Attached is an image of segmented bacteria in termite gut with the first, second and fourth panels showing colored volumetric rendering. &nbsp;This is from a project 5 years ago with Manfred Auer at LBL — here’s a poster that I took these images from</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/data/termitegut.pdf" class="">http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/data/termitegut.pdf</a></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">That capability didn’t make it into Chimera though (I thought it was a secret command called vmask, but in fact that is so secret it only resides on my machine). &nbsp;If you are into hacking Chimera Python code the underlying support to color volumetric rendering is there. &nbsp;If v is your Volume object you set v.mask_colors = a function that can modulate the colors for grid points. &nbsp;I’ll attach the code called I used to make the image below as an example. &nbsp;It uses a segmentation integer array the same size as the density map where different integer values correspond to different segmentation regions — then it assigns random colors to each region (preserving the transparency).</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>Tom</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""></div></body></html>