<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">Hi Eric,<div><br></div><div>&nbsp; I see what you mean. &nbsp;I tried exporting 100,000 atoms as spheres (PDB 1jj2) and the STL file was larger than 100 Gbytes, or more than 1 Mbyte per sphere! &nbsp;Ouch. &nbsp;Each triangle takes 48 bytes in an STL file so that comes to 20,000 triangles per sphere. &nbsp;Looking at the Chimera code I see that the trouble is that the Export Scene function does not use the subdivision shown on the screen for spheres. &nbsp;Instead it exports to X3D format an exact description of a sphere (center and radius). &nbsp;Then the x3d2stl conversion program is run by Chimera and it uses a fixed subdivision of each sphere which has an absurdly high resolution of ~11,000 vertices or 22,000 triangles per sphere for a 1.5 Angstrom radius sphere (also the subdivision is proportional to sphere radius squared, so it will give huge numbers of triangles if you make a sphere of radius 10, although it is capped at ~128,000 triangles per sphere). &nbsp;Unfortunately Chimera does not have a way to say to use lower resolution for spheres when exporting the scene. &nbsp;But there is a way to do it because the x3d2stl program that comes with Chimera has a resolution option. &nbsp;So the trick will be to use Export Scene to write an x3d format file. &nbsp;Then run x3d2stl by hand from a terminal x3d2stl -r 0.1 -o file.stl &lt; file.x3d. &nbsp;The default resolution is 100 and the number of sphere triangles scales linearly with the resolution value. &nbsp;The minimum number of sphere triangles is 12. &nbsp;I tried this for 1jj2, the x3d file sizes was just 15 Mbytes.</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>/Applications/Chimera.app/Contents/Resources/bin/x3d2stl -o 1jj2.stl -r 0.01 &lt; 1jj2.x3d</div><div><br></div><div>and the STL file came out to 59 Mbytes which agrees with 12 triangles per sphere taking about 500 bytes per sphere. &nbsp;Ive attached a close-up of what 12 triangle spheres looked like when I opened the 1jj2.stl file in Chimera. &nbsp;The path to x3d2stl I used was on a Mac. &nbsp;On Linux or Windows the program would be in chimera/bin.</div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp; Ill file a Chimera bug report to have the absurdly high subdivision fixed.</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>Tom</div><div><br></div><div><img height="512" width="512" apple-width="yes" apple-height="yes" apple-inline="yes" id="1D7335EA-348D-4452-ABBA-03E0860DA34D" src="cid:BAF7E673-7D77-4ABB-AAAF-787E685CB556@cgl.ucsf.edu"></div><div><br><div><div>On Jun 18, 2014, at 6:09 PM, Eric Bell wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">Hello,<br><br>I am trying to change the resolution of the atoms for a large molecule packing, but no matter how I change the zoom or the subdivisions property in the viewing effects, it seems to always produce the same filesize (~900 MB, not something our software can handle). &nbsp;Is this a bug or is it something that I'm doing incorrectly? &nbsp;I'm running on a mac, and I have tested this both with a .mol2 and .pdb file.<br><br>Thanks,<br>Eric<br>_______________________________________________<br>Chimera-users mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu">Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu</a><br>http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/mailman/listinfo/chimera-users<br><br></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>