<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Hi Matthias,<div><br></div><div>&nbsp; I think there are many ways to get Chimera output into 3D PDF if you are willing to drop $600 on commercial software. &nbsp;The trouble is that you have to produce &nbsp;the 3d model in U3D format and then the U3D can be embedded in PDF. &nbsp;Those two conversion steps, going from a Chimera 3d export format such as X3D to U3D and the U3D to PDF I believe can be done by many commercial applications. &nbsp;But I don't know free applications to do it. &nbsp;There may well be free applications but it might take a whole day of digging on the web to find them. &nbsp;If you do find them let us know.</div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp; It is easier to find a commercial software conversion route. &nbsp;For instance PolyTrans ($395) from Okino Computer Graphics claims to read X3D and export U3D, and Adobe Acrobat Pro X ($200) can put U3D into PDF files.</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><a href="http://www.okino.com/conv/filefrmt_3dexport.htm">http://www.okino.com/conv/filefrmt_3dexport.htm</a></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space: pre; ">        </span><a href="http://help.adobe.com/en_US/acrobat/X/pro/using/WS58a04a822e3e50102bd615109794195ff-7c08.w.html">http://help.adobe.com/en_US/acrobat/X/pro/using/WS58a04a822e3e50102bd615109794195ff-7c08.w.html</a></div><div><br></div><div>I've never tried this and would definitely worry about whether PolyTrans or any other software will faithfully handle Chimera's X3D output.</div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp; I think the basic problem is U3D and 3D PDF are used by almost noone. &nbsp;The Okino web site gives some idea of the trouble with U3D: "Okino also has a&nbsp;long history&nbsp;involved with the U3D file format. U3D has quite a tainted history in the development&nbsp;community. It was derived from the old Intel IFX 3D gaming toolkit of the 1990's and forced upon developers as the&nbsp;Macromedia 'Shockwave-3D&nbsp;file format' in 2000. The Shockwave-3D format was abandoned in 2002 and then it resurfaced in&nbsp;2004 when Intel forced it upon Adobe as the 3D file format to use within 3D PDF files (instead of Adobe using the better X3D&nbsp;file format). With the IFX toolkit being so buggy, Okino spent much of 2004 through to 2007 debugging the IFX toolkit and&nbsp;creating the main, defacto implementation of the U3D import/export converters."</div><div><br></div><div>&nbsp; The AxPyMol plug-in you mention does not produce PDF (and is commercial, $148 academic, or $404 for a lab license, 1 year subscription). &nbsp;It embeds 3d PyMol scenes in PowerPoint -- there is no PDF involved as far as I can tell. &nbsp;It uses an Active X plug-in (only available on Windows).</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>Tom</div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On Jun 20, 2013, at 10:29 AM, Matthias Barone wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><meta name="Author" content="Novell GroupWise WebAccess"><div style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; ">Hi Tom and Conrad<br>Thank you for the fast replies and sorry for not being clear:<br>Im doing all presentations with the beamer package of latex and hence search an interactive way to show 3D models of x-ray protein structures instead of showing pictures.<br>What Im therefore searching is a way to make a pdf that provides me a 3D model (incl. mouse gestures like zoom, rotate, clip) with pre-set layout (ribbon, electron density colours and so on set in chimera). <br><br>matthias<br><br><br><br><br><br>&gt;&gt;&gt; Conrad Huang &lt;<a href="mailto:conrad@cgl.ucsf.edu">conrad@cgl.ucsf.edu</a>&gt; 20.06.13 19.16 Uhr &gt;&gt;&gt;<br>Collada format is used by Apple's iBooks Author program to embed 3D <br>graphics.  Collada files, with .dae extension, can also be displayed in <br>Apple's Preview application.<br><br>I don't believe Collada is at all related to PDF, which uses U3D format <br>for 3D data.  MeshLab is supposed to read many data formats, including <br>Collada, and generate U3D output.  Unfortunately, Chimera Collada output <br>is not read properly by MeshLab; triangle per-vertex colors, specified <br>as an RGBA data source, seem to be ignored.  Worse, saving U3D output <br>(so at least we get the geometric shape) also fails, producing, from <br>Chimera's 28MB Collada file, 2 1KB files (no, I don't think it's due to <br>compression :-) ).<br><br>The bottom line is that I do not have anything new to contribute on the <br>PDF front.  Sorry.<br><br>Conrad<br><br>On 6/19/2013 9:43 PM, Tom Goddard wrote:<br>&gt; Hi Matthias,<br>&gt;<br>&gt;    I'm not clear on what your goal is.  You talk about embedding<br>&gt; molecule models in PDF, in Latex and in HTML.<br>&gt;<br>&gt;    Conrad Huang in our lab added Collada export to Chimera so that<br>&gt; molecular models could be dropped into some ebook format but I'm not<br>&gt; sure if that format was PDF or something else.  Have to find out from<br>&gt; him.  We are also working on displaying 3d views of molecules in a web<br>&gt; browser using WebGL and Chimera can export an html file for that.  Those<br>&gt; files tend to be large and you need a web browser that supports WebGL to<br>&gt; view them.  The Collada and HTML export are under Chimera menu entry<br>&gt; File / Exportů.  The Collada export is in Chimera daily builds and HTML<br>&gt; export is in Chimera 1.8.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; Tom<br>&gt;<br>&gt;<br>&gt; On Jun 19, 2013, at 5:41 AM, "Matthias Barone"  wrote:<br>&gt;<br>&gt;&gt; Hi<br>&gt;&gt; I keep on searching for a solution for embedding atomic models in pdf<br>&gt;&gt; (by LaTex). In PowerPoint a plugin called AxPyMol does the job nicely,<br>&gt;&gt; but I want to use chimera. You were already discussing a similar topic<br>&gt;&gt; in<br>&gt;&gt; <a href="http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/pipermail/chimera-users/2008-May/002663.html">http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/pipermail/chimera-users/2008-May/002663.html</a> The<br>&gt;&gt; question in the topic was whether its possible to incorporate<br>&gt;&gt; mesh-data (via programs like MeshLab, Photoshop and the movie15<br>&gt;&gt; package) into .tex files.<br>&gt;&gt; But Im searching for latex packages to display and manipulate atomc<br>&gt;&gt; models. Exporting in html could be a way to desplay everything but<br>&gt;&gt; electron densities (although html doesnt support mouse gestures)<br>&gt;&gt; sincerly, matthias<br>&gt;&gt; _______________________________________________<br>&gt;&gt; Chimera-users mailing list<br>&gt;&gt; <a href="mailto:Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu">Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu</a> &lt;<a href="mailto:Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu">mailto:Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu</a>&gt;<br>&gt;&gt; <a href="http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/mailman/listinfo/chimera-users">http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/mailman/listinfo/chimera-users</a><br>&gt;<br>&gt;<br>&gt;<br>&gt; _______________________________________________<br>&gt; Chimera-users mailing list<br>&gt; <a href="mailto:Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu">Chimera-users@cgl.ucsf.edu</a><br>&gt; <a href="http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/mailman/listinfo/chimera-users">http://plato.cgl.ucsf.edu/mailman/listinfo/chimera-users</a><br>&gt;<br><br><br></div>
</blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>