<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif">Hi Elaine,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif">
I want to compare two different docking poses with the same ligand and receptor. The only difference is that, in one of the receptors, it was included a water molecule. So, as a result, the ligand occupies a vey different position in the active site (approximately moved 2 angstroms and rotated 180 degrees) compared to the ligand in the first receptor (without the water molecule). Now, I want to discuss this difference in a quantitative manner, but if I try to calculate the RMSD of the entire docking poses, Chimera and other programs only take into account the receptor and not the ligand, and as a result my RMSD is 0.000. Now, if I &#39;cut&#39; the ligand and save it as a different file in both cases, once I try to calculate RMSD, the original position of the ligands is lost, and I obtain a undesirable value. Is it the estimation of RMSD appropriate (informative) for evaluating the conformational change of my ligand to discuss the difference in protein-ligand interaction?<br>
<br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif">Best regards,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif"><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all"><div>
<div dir="ltr"><div><div><font face="verdana, sans-serif"><b>Andrés Felipe Vásquez J., MSc.</b><br>Grupo de Fisiología Molecular<br>Instituto Nacional de Salud<br>Avenida calle 26 No. 51-20 - Zona 6 CAN<br>Bogotá, D.C., Colombia<span style="font-size:small"> </span></font><br>
</div></div></div></div>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2013/5/31 Elaine Meng <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:meng@cgl.ucsf.edu" target="_blank">meng@cgl.ucsf.edu</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Hi Andrés,<br>
The &quot;rmsd&quot; command calculates RMSD in the current positions, without moving any atoms to fit.  See:<br>
<br>
&lt;<a href="http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/UsersGuide/midas/rmsd.html" target="_blank">http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/UsersGuide/midas/rmsd.html</a>&gt;<br>
<br>
MatchMaker  only uses the CA atoms of the protein chains in fitting and in calculating the RMSD, so the value from MatchMaker wouldn&#39;t tell you anything about the ligand.  Instead, you might use MatchMaker first to superimpose the proteins, if they aren&#39;t already superimposed, and then use the &quot;rmsd&quot; command to compare the resulting two ligand positions.<br>

<br>
Explanation of the different superposition methods in Chimera and how they work:<br>
&lt;<a href="http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/UsersGuide/superposition.html" target="_blank">http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/UsersGuide/superposition.html</a>&gt;<br>
<br>
I hope this helps,<br>
Elaine<br>
----------<br>
Elaine C. Meng, Ph.D.<br>
UCSF Computer Graphics Lab (Chimera team) and Babbitt Lab<br>
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry<br>
University of California, San Francisco<br>
<br>
On May 30, 2013, at 12:43 PM, felipe vasquez &lt;<a href="mailto:anfelvas@gmail.com">anfelvas@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote<br>
<div class="im HOEnZb">&gt; Hi,<br>
&gt; I am working on the modeling of one ligand in a native and mutant receptor. The ligand occupies different positions in the binding cavity, and I am interested in estimate this difference. However, if RMSD is calculated via MatchMaker, the ligand in mutant receptor (non-reference) is moved from its original position to try to minimize the deviation compared to ligand in native receptor (reference). How can I calculate the difference in the ligand position between the two receptors, in an appropriate manner?<br>

</div><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">&gt; Andrés Felipe Vásquez J., MSc.<br>
&gt; Grupo de Fisiología Molecular<br>
&gt; Instituto Nacional de Salud<br>
&gt; Avenida calle 26 No. 51-20 - Zona 6 CAN<br>
&gt; Bogotá, D.C., Colombia<br>
<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>